Neagley

Early Medieval Art (3 cr.)

This course considers the art and architecture produced in Europe between the fifth and twelfth centuries. The first third of the course examines the transformation of European culture between the fall of Rome and the rise of the Carolingians, including the mingling of Christian, Roman, Germanic, and Byzantine traditions reflected in the work of the Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Lombards, Celts, Anglo Saxons, and Merovingians. The second third of the course will deal with the so-called "Carolingian Renaissance" associated with Charlemagne and his successors.

Visual Culture of Medieval Pilgrimage (3 cr.)

This seminar explores the rich visual culture associated with Medieval pilgrimage between the fourth and fifteenth centuries. The experience of pilgrimage was shaped by symbols, images, and places encountered along the routes to sites of sacred significance, especially the roads to Jerusalem, Rome, Santiago, and Canterbury. We will examine the theological, practical, visual, and experiential aspects of pilgrimage in Western Europe and the Holy Land as understood through visual culture and contemporary texts.

Visual Culture of Medieval Pilgrimage (3 cr.)

This seminar explores the rich visual culture associated with Medieval pilgrimage between the fourth and fifteenth centuries. The experience of pilgrimage was shaped by symbols, images, and places encountered along the routes to sites of sacred significance, especially the roads to Jerusalem, Rome, Santiago, and Canterbury. We will examine the theological, practical, visual, and experiential aspects of pilgrimage in Western Europe and the Holy Land as understood through visual culture and contemporary texts.

Early Medieval Art (3 cr.)

This course considers the art and architecture produced in Europe between the fifth and twelfth centuries. The first third of the course examines the transformation of European culture between the fall of Rome and the rise of the Carolingians, including the mingling of Christian, Roman, Germanic, and Byzantine traditions reflected in the work of the Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Lombards, Celts, Anglo Saxons, and Merovingians. The second third of the course will deal with the so-called "Carolingian Renaissance" associated with Charlemagne and his successors.