Wolfthal

Seeing Sex in European Art (3 Cr.)

For each lecture, Graduate Students will be assigned additional readings. They will write an annotated bibliography of all these readings to be turned in at the end of the semester. We will meet for an additional every two or three weeks to discuss interpretive and methodological problems and ideas associated with the readings. Graduate Students will be expected to complete all the requirements of the class in addition to writing a substantial research paper due at the end of the semester.

Seeing Sex in European Art (3 Cr.)

This course will examine the visual history of sexuality from 1400-1700. It will explore how imagery structured sexual desire; the role of erotic sacred art; the rise of pornography; the intersection of spatial topography and sexuality; the linkage of licit and illicit sexualities; and the sexuality of artist and patrons.
Graduate Equivalency: HART 534. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HART 434 and HART 534.
Cross-listed with MDEM 434, SWGS 434.

Capitalism and Culture (3 cr.)

This seminar will examine the way European culture, especially art, was shaped by the rise of the monetary economy and capitalism, beginning in the late Middle Ages and continuing into modern times. Faculty will meet separately on a bi-weekly basis with graduate students in the class who will also be assigned extra readings. Graduate work will be evaluated on a more challenging scale, with particular attention to methodological and interpretive rigor.
Graduate/Undergraduate Equivalency: HART 344. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HART 544 and HART 344.

Capitalism and Culture (3 cr.)

This seminar will examine the way European culture, especially art, was shaped by the rise of the monetary economy and capitalism, beginning in the late Middle Ages and continuing into modern times.
Graduate/Undergraduate Equivalency: HART 544. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HART 344 and HART 544.

Multicultural Europe,1400-1700 (3 cr.)

The art of Europe was never the product of a single culture working in isolation. This seminar will explore the multicultural aspects of medieval and early modern Europe by focusing on the visual culture of groups who defined themselves or are today defined by nationality, race, or religion. For each lecture, Graduate Students will be assigned additional readings. They will write an annotated bibliography of all the readings to be turned in at the end of the semester.